Release Version of Wine

Latest Releases

Stable: Wine 1.4.1 (shortlog)
Development: Wine 1.5.23 (shortlog)

News

February 1, 2013
The Wine development release 1.5.23 is now available.
What’s new in this release:
  • HTTPS support no longer dependent on OpenSSL.
  • Support for event handling in the Mac driver.
  • A functional Netstat built-in application.
  • A bunch of C++ runtime math functions.
  • Various bug fixes.

The source is available now. Binary packages are in the process of being built, and will appear soon at their respective download locations.

January 18, 2013
The Wine development release 1.5.22 is now available.
What’s new in this release:
  • New version of the Gecko engine.
  • Beginnings of the Mac graphics driver.
  • Support for ARM64 platforms.
  • Fixes for RTL text in Uniscribe.
  • Various bug fixes.

The source is available now. Binary packages are in the process of being built, and will appear soon at their respective download locations.

January 4, 2013
The Wine development release 1.5.21 is now available.
What’s new in this release:
  • Beginnings of a netstat built-in program.
  • Support for selecting resolution in the PostScript driver.
  • Various bug fixes.

The source is available now. Binary packages are in the process of being built, and will appear soon at their respective download locations.

December 21, 2012
The Wine development release 1.5.20 is now available.
What’s new in this release:
  • A bunch of dlls with ugly names for API sets support.
  • More ATL functions implemented.
  • Still more C++ runtime functions.
  • Several text rendering fixes.
  • PostScript driver improvements.
  • Various bug fixes.

The source is available now. Binary packages are in the process of being built, and will appear soon at their respective download locations.

December 7, 2012
The Wine development release 1.5.19 is now available.
What’s new in this release:
  • Performance improvements in the DIB engine.
  • More fleshed out XML-lite implementation.
  • Some more C++ runtime functions.
  • Various bug fixes.

The source is available now. Binary packages are in the process of being built, and will appear soon at their respective download locations.

November 23, 2012
The Wine development release 1.5.18 is now available.
What’s new in this release:
  • Various Windows Codecs improvements.
  • Fixes for OLE database support.
  • Improvements to system parameters management.
  • Some fixes to the built-in Web browser.
  • Fixes for XML support.
  • Various bug fixes.

The source is available now. Binary packages are in the process of being built, and will appear soon at their respective download locations.

November 9, 2012
The Wine development release 1.5.17 is now available.
What’s new in this release:
  • Sub-pixel font anti-aliasing in the DIB engine.
  • Support for automatic installation of ActiveX controls.
  • Automatic fallback to TLS 1.0 for secure connections.
  • Beginnings of the DirectWrite text analyzer.
  • Better handling of font outlines in OpenGL.
  • Various bug fixes.

The source is available now. Binary packages are in the process of being built, and will appear soon at their respective download locations.

October 26, 2012
The Wine development release 1.5.16 is now available.
What’s new in this release:
  • New version of the Mono package.
  • Many improvements to the CMD command-line parser.
  • More stream classes in the C++ runtime.
  • Support for managing services in WMI.
  • Improved CPU detection.
  • Various bug fixes.

The source is available now. Binary packages are in the process of being built, and will appear soon at their respective download locations.

October 12, 2012
The Wine development release 1.5.15 is now available.
What’s new in this release:
  • Full support for layered windows.
  • New version of the Gecko engine based on Firefox 16.
  • Support for broadcast sockets used by networked games.
  • Downloaded add-ons installers are now cached.
  • Support for persistent Internet cookies.
  • String optimizations in JavaScript.
  • Various bug fixes.

The source is available now. Binary packages are in the process of being built, and will appear soon at their respective download locations.

September 28, 2012
The Wine development release 1.5.14 is now available.
What’s new in this release:
  • Much better behavior of the URL cache.
  • Improved GIF image support.
  • More parser features in the shader compiler.
  • Optimizations in JavaScript.
  • Various bug fixes.

The source is available now. Binary packages are in the process of being built, and will appear soon at their respective download locations.

more news…

Supported Wine

Product Description
CrossOver Linux or Mac CrossOver is a polished version of Wine provided by CodeWeavers. CrossOver makes it easier to use Wine and CodeWeavers provides excellent technical support to its users. All purchases of CrossOver are used to directly fund the developers working on Wine. So CrossOver is both a great way to get support in using Wine and to support the Wine Project. CodeWeavers provides fully functional trial versions of CrossOver.
This endorsement is the primary recognition that CodeWeavers has requested in exchange for hosting the Wine web site.

Wine Binary Downloads

Latest stable release: Wine 1.4.1 See the installation and configuration how-to for post-installation instructions.
Latest development release: Wine 1.5.23
System Notes Maintainer
Ubuntu linux Download Ubuntu packages – binary and source .debs for Ubuntu Oneiric (11.10), and Precise (12.04) Scott Ritchie
Debian Linux Download Debian packages – binary .debs for Debian Sid Kai Wasserbäch
Red Hat Linux Download Red Hat / CentOS / Fedora packages – binary and source .rpms for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, 6; CentOS 5, 6; Fedora Linux 16, 17 and compatible distributions. The wine meta package is available via yum through the EPEL / Fedora Extras / Fedora repository by running $ yum install wine Andreas Bierfert
SUSE Linux Download SUSE packages – release binary and source .rpms and daily snapshot RPMs for openSUSE 11.1, 11.2, 11.3, 11.4 and SUSE Linux Enterprise 10 and 11.
Old package versions available on SourceForge
Marcus Meissner
Mandriva Linux Download Mandriva packages – binary .rpms for Mandriva Linux 2008, 2009, and 2010. Download the 2010.2 package if your Mandriva is a 2010.2 release, e.g. 2010 Spring. Download the 2010.0 package if your Mandriva is the first 2010 release. Marco Meijer
Slackware linux Download Slackware packages – binary txz (Slackware 14.0), and tgz (for older versions) Simone Giustetti
FreeBSD Download FreeBSD packages – source for FreeBSD 5.3 or later Gerald Pfeifer
FreeBSD Download PC-BSD packages – binary packages .pbi for PC-BSD (FreeBSD based OS) Kris Moore
Solaris 10 Download Solaris 10, SXCE packages – ASwine, ASwine-SXCE binary package .pkg for Solaris 10 and SXCE x86 Apostolos Syropoulos
OpenSolaris Download OpenSolaris packages – binary package .pkg for OpenSolaris x86 Apostolos Syropoulos
Maemo Download Maemo packages – binary package .deb for Maemo x86 and Maemo ARM Kaj-Michael Lang

3rd Party Tools

Sometimes a customization of Wine can cause an application to work, but this change cannot be incorporated into Wine for some reason. To help overcome current deficiencies in Wine, various third party applications for end users have been made over the years. These applications are entirely unsupported by the Wine developers, however you may find them useful. For more information, see our wiki page on third party applications.

Wine Source Downloads

Location Description
sourceforge.net Our official source release site.
source.winehq.org/git For the latest development version.
ibiblio.org Alternative download site for the official source and documentation tarballs.
Note: See the recommended packages for help on configuring and building Wine.

Wine HowTo

Before you install Wine, make sure that there is no previous Wine installation on your system, either from a package or from source. If you haven’t yet installed Wine, you should be fine. See the Removing old Wine versions chapter in the User Guide for details. Many Linux distributions come with an included Wine package, but due to Wine’s rapid development rate these are usually old and often broken versions. It is best to uninstall your distribution’s included package versions and update to the latest Wine version available here.
Ready-made, updated binary packages for Wine can be found at the WineHQ downloads page. In addition, full source code is available for both the current Wine development tree and every Wine release here. For help with installing from a package or from source, please consult the Getting Wine chapter of the User guide.
Note to Debian/Ubuntu users: The packages included in the main distribution are currently very out of date. We’re working on having the latest packages available officially from Debian/Ubuntu’s servers, but until then we suggest you install the latest Wine by using our apt repository here. Debian Lenny/Squeeze/Sid users can install the latest Wine packages by using the repository here.

How to help get applications working in Wine

If you want to help get an application working in Wine, the first thing you should do is register yourself in the AppDB and fill out a test report, so others know what works/doesn’t work. Also, be sure to vote for your favorite application so developers know where to concentrate their efforts.
If the application that you want working is not listed in the AppDB there is an easy to use form available for you to add it. If the application is in the database, but lacks a maintainer, you should consider volunteering. If you are familiar with Wine and have a desire to test the application and help get or keep it working, please apply by clicking the link in the application’s page. Each application should have a supermaintainer, and, if different versions of the application are substantially different (such as in Adobe Creative Suite), each subversion should have a maintainer. Please don’t feel deterred by the need to apply to become a maintainer – the application form is largely a formality to prevent abuse and to take some of the load off of the AppDB administrators.
If you are the developer or publisher of the application, you obviously have a very big incentive to help get your application working under Wine. Fortunately, there are many options available to you other than reporting bugs and hoping someone will fix them. By far the easiest way is to file a bug at Bugzilla, along with a small testcase to add to the Wine test suite. Another options is to send copies of your software to Wine developers and hope they’ll take an interest in getting it working. An alternative option, perhaps more effective, albeit expensive, is to pay Wine developers for their work on your application, either directly through a negotiated contract or indirectly by posting a bounty. CodeWeavers, a major Wine developer, offers a special section for pledges at their compatibility center website. The most direct method, however, is to help develop Wine itself and contribute code directly, which is exactly what Corel did for WordPerfect several years ago. In any case, making a post on the Wine developers email list can go a long way.

If your application doesn’t work

If your application experiences problems in a particular area, or fails to even run at all, there are a number of steps you can take to help us. The most important thing is to find out where exactly the application is failing. To diagnose application problems, the first step is to run the program from the console using Wine, rather than from a gui shortcut. This will allow Wine to output error messages to the console, the understanding of which are key to solving the problem and getting the application to work.
An application may not work because Wine doesn’t yet fully implement one of the DLL files the application is trying to use. If you encounter a DLL not found error, or see a lot of “FIXME:” messages while running the application in Wine, this is likely the case. When this occurs, you can try using native (non-Wine) DLL files in place of Wine’s builtin ones. Check the AppDB page for the program. There may be special configuration options or instructions for installing native DLL files there that you can try to get the application working. For further configuration help, please see the Running Wine section of the User Guide.
If the application still doesn’t work, it’s probably due to a bug or deficiency in Wine and we’d like to hear about it. Please see the reporting bugs page for instructions on how to best report bugs with applications. Alternatively, if you’re a programmer, we’d really like it if you tried to help us directly; please check out the primary Developers page and the Developers-Hints if you’re interested.

If your application does work, but with some difficulty

Sometimes, applications run under Wine but don’t function quite as smoothly as they do in windows. They may have display errors, a feature may be broken, or they may run unusually slow. These applications should receive a lower rating from their maintainers (“bronze” or “garbage”) in the Application’s Database, depending on the degree of difficulty encountered.
If you have found a way to make an application work that is more complicated than simply installing it, please share that information by posting on the application’s page in the database. If you are the maintainer for the application, please post the instructions in a “howto” which will appear inside green bars at the top of the application’s page.

If your application used to work, but has since broken in a new version of Wine

Wine is a large and complex project, composed of many files written by different authors. Sometimes, an attempt to change a file and expand support for one application will unexpectedly cause another application to stop functioning. These changes are known as regressions, and they are unfortunately sometimes found in the Wine source code because the author of a patch that causes a regression is quite simply unaware of it. Since the Wine developers can’t possibly test every application with every patch, we have to rely on the community to inform us of when regressions occur so that the problem can be easily identified and ultimately fixed. Without community involvement, regressions can go unfixed for potentially very long periods of time.
If your application has experienced a regression, please try and provide us with as much information as you can about when and how it broke. This allows us to isolate the exact thing we screwed up in the code and provide a fix. Please provide as much as you know about which version of Wine worked, and which version didn’t, including the version number and how you installed it (from source, binary packages, etc.) Finally, please post these things in a bug.

If you wish to be extremely helpful, you can try to isolate the exact patch which broke your application. This takes quite a bit of time, but minimal effort and computer skills, but it is quite simply the best way to get your application working again. When it comes to fixing regressions, the only thing more helpful to the Wine developers than knowing exactly which patch caused a regression is receiving a fix for the patch itself. For help with isolating problem patches, please see the documentation on RegressionTesting.

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